Cycling in support of Limbs For Life

Cycling in support of Limbs For Life
Cycling in support of Limbs For Life

Friday, February 7, 2014

Alfred

Alfred is the name I gave him. Alf for short. The little white dog who ran his heart out, chasing me through the Ruta de Lagunas.
This is where Alfro came from. The military camp at Chiguana. I showed up in the evening and was invited to stay in one of the weird camo domes. There were  6 young Bolivian dudes doing their 1 year mandatory military service. Home also to a few dogs, not exactly treated well. I saw one guy kick his way through them rather than simply walk around. 

I noticed him first a km or two away from the camp. Quietly trotting behind. I tried to turn him around. I tried chasing him back; He only thought I was playing.  So we played chase for a while out on the salt in the early morning.


There was no unlatching him from me. He just looked at me funny when I said Vamanos and pointed to the way back. This is when he ate my can of tuna and took a nap.    

helpful...

and Alfonso helping me lube my chain

Alfcor


Chasing Vicuna

The Vicuna that chased back


A sunny morning after a cold night. Someone didnt bring their own sleeping bag and thought they would just share mine


For much of the route we didn't feel the need to follow the road.




Arbol Piedra. A Bolivian National Monument

Alfrohar... A Bolivian National Track Star. Averaged 70km a day for 4 days




Our parting shot together. A photogenic lot we are.

Laguna Verde. Alfred's new home. He is now living with the family at the Refugio. He ran about 300km- Fom a crappy military camp to hopefully a loving family. The adventure of his young life. We locked him in a room while I rode away... I tried not to look back.  

I reached the main road a while later. With big trucks roaring by. I knew it was the right decision. I'll miss ya buddy.

17 comments:

  1. Bikes and dogs are a terrific combo. Though I understand why you didn't continue to bring him along with you, I might not have been able to do the same. His stamina and sense of adventure led him to a better life, which is a good analogy for time spent on a bike.

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    1. Andy, It was super tough to leave him. Such a good little dude. I just couldn't bare to think of him running lose on the highway. I can't carry him and to think of dragging him with a leash. No way. I thought it best to just find him a home on a rural area where he can roam about. I checked out all the places along the way and Laguna verde was the friendliest family that didn't already have several dogs. He sure earned a better life for himself.

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    2. As soon as I saw your caption on the bottom photo about big trucks, I knew. I spent a couple of years in Central Asia and saw too many animal carcasses on the road. On behalf of dogs everywhere, including my dog, who came from a difficult situation and now loves to run with me when I ride, thanks for helping Alfred along. May good canine karma accompany you.

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  2. Amazing post, got me a little misty. Thanks for the story.

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    1. Thanx HS. Leaving him got me a bit misty too

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  3. Jeff and Kinsee say hello! What a great tail (pun intended).

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    1. Hey Kinsee and Jeff, great to hear from yous. How's life and where you two at?

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  4. A dog sure can break your heart... I lost mine to one in Panama but I knew I couldn't take him with me when I left there. He was a trouble puppy.

    I had really lovely dog try to follow me to Mendoza, too, but after ten kilometres or so I did a good impression of mean chasing her away so she didn't end up stuck in the desert with no water and no way 'home'.

    Good on you for sharing your tuna and finding this boy a nice new family.

    So,... when are you going to catch up to share a few miles and a cup of coffee?

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    1. Yea, Dogs... Multiple border crossings and no way for them to ride on the bike. Not the best combo for either party.
      Catching up almost seems more of a running joke. I got Patagonia on the brain though. I'm doing between 130 and 160km days across the desert. I'll be in Mendoza in a day er so. Still we'll to the north.
      Safe travels

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    2. Well, don't know what your post-Patagonia plans are but mine involve more cycling so if not Patagonia then somewhere else on this big/small spinning stone ball of ours. Maybe Africa, or something.

      (In the meantime, I've got about a month before I hit Ushaia, I reckon, cruising slowlyish... just bought a hook and line and hope to catch a trout or two so that might offer some distraction and offer an excuse to while away some sunny afternoons or mornings by the river.)

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    3. Yea huh? I don't imagine either of us flinging down our bikes in Ushuaia and scrambling off to some domestic life.
      That puts me about a month behind you, give or take a week. That's accounting for the knowing that the greenery will cool my current pace.
      Some good company for a dog leg of Africa? That's an idea!
      See ya when I see ya. Good luck with the fishin' and safe travels to you as well

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  5. Touching story Kurt. As you know we love dogs. We have four again. A good story in it's self. Safe journey my friend.

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  6. Thanx Batman
    That little guy really got ahold of me. It was only thinking of the better for him that I could ride away.
    Yea definitely a story on itself. You guys have always had dogs as long as I can remember. Since my memory started more like. Love you guys, give the fam a hug for me.

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